Management and accountability

Corporate governance

We have a well-defined and effective governance structure. Our peak governing body is the National Management Board, which is supported by a number of operational committees and boards (see Figure 8).

Senior executive roles and responsibilities are outlined in the organisational chart in Section 1.

Figure 8: Governance structure, at 30 June 2019

Main boards and committees

National Management Board

The National Management Board’s role is to assist the Chief Executive to manage our organisation and fulfil the responsibilities of the Inspector-General in Bankruptcy, Official Receiver, Official Trustee and the Registrar of Personal Property Securities. The board comprises our senior executive, the Chief People Officer and an independent (external) member. It sets our strategic direction, determines appropriate policies, and monitors performance for administration and operational service delivery.

The National Management Board met eight times during 2018–19, including two strategic planning meetings.

Members of AFSA’s National Management Board. L–R: Paul Shaw, Andrew Sellars, David Bergman, Bridie Dawson (Chief People Officer), Hamish McCormick (AFSA Chief Executive and Chair), Carol Lilley (external member), David Johnson, Joanna Stone, Gavin McCosker and Peter Edwards. (See Figure 1 for other position titles.)

Risk and Operations Management Committee

The Risk and Operations Management Committee comprises key operational managers from across the agency and has a specific focus on the development, monitoring and management of our operational plan.

The committee is responsible for coordinating and managing activities in relation to risk and performance. It identifies and, where necessary, escalates the management of issues and risks that have the potential to affect our functions and the achievement of our corporate vision and goals. The Risk and Operations Management Committee supports the National Management Board, the Audit Committee and the Enterprise Risk Manager in overseeing and managing operational risks and performance.

The committee met four times during 2018–19.

Members of AFSA’s Risk and Operations Management Committee and guest observers/presenters. L–R: Meg Wooten (guest observer), Brett Miles, Julie Padgett (acting member), Ravi-Inder Singh Kaura, Michelle Tilke (guest observer), Kate Warnock (guest presenter), Amanda Rice, Liam Demamiel, Jenni Pain, Tim Cole (acting Chair), Vanessa Goodey and Stephen Abraham.

Audit Committee

Our Audit Committee advises the Chief Executive and the National Management Board on a range of audit and financial practice matters. It has five members: an independent (external) chair, two independent (external) members and two AFSA executives.

In 2018–19, the committee considered the results of our internal and external audits and, importantly, the action taken to respond to auditors’ recommendations. It also monitored our application of, and compliance with, systems and frameworks for ensuring high levels of internal controls, financial reporting, risk management and fraud control.

Audit Committee meetings are ordinarily attended by our internal auditors, the Deputy Chief Executive (as Chief Audit Executive), the Chief Finance Officer, the Chief Information Officer and the Finance Manager. Representatives of the Australian National Audit Office also attend as observers.

Our internal audits test both compliance and performance. Areas of audit focus during 2018–19 included procurement and contract management, project governance, workforce planning, work health and safety, the Personal Property Securities Register cost recovery framework, and our performance reporting framework.

The Audit Committee met four times during 2018–19.

Members of AFSA’s Audit Committee. L–R: Chris Ramsden (independent member), Mark Ridley (independent Chair), Maria Storti (independent member) and Stephen Abraham (Director, Insolvency and Trustee Services, AFSA).

National Consultative Committee

Our National Consultative Committee was established to encourage and facilitate an appropriate level of employee input to decision-making, and to enable organisational change to be handled effectively and efficiently. Further information can be found under ‘Management of human resources’ in this section.

The National Consultative Committee met twice in 2018–19.

Personal Property Securities Register Program Group

The role of the Personal Property Securities Register (PPSR) Program Group is to coordinate, direct and oversee operational activities in relation to the PPSR.

The PPSR Program Group is responsible for PPSR project initiation, including endorsement of final requirements for PPSR-related projects. The management and oversight of PPSR project-related operational activities is the responsibility of the Program Board.

The PPSR Program Group is also responsible for providing oversight of risk at a program level.

The group met six times in 2018–19.

ICT Steering Committee

The ICT Steering Committee oversees our technology-based activities to ensure they align with our strategic direction and comply with agreed performance and enterprise architectural standards.

Key roles of the steering committee include providing strategic advice to the National Management Board, reviewing and endorsing frameworks and policies, and ensuring the application of appropriate technology standards.

The committee met five times in 2018–19.

Program Board

The Program Board provides guidance to ensure the strategic alignment and success of our programs. The board monitors the status of projects and associated risks, makes decisions or ensures action on matters presented, appoints business leads to projects, ensures project benefits align to our corporate goals and overall strategic direction, and monitors the financial risks relating to projects through regular reporting.

The Program Board met 11 times in 2018–19.

Security Advisory Group

The role of the Security Advisory Group is to oversee compliance with the Protective Security Policy Framework and the Australian Government Information Security Manual.

Compliance with the framework and the manual is achieved by implementing and maintaining agency security controls developed through risk-based analysis.

The Security Advisory Group met five times in 2018–19.

Corporate and divisional plans

We maintain an integrated planning process, which is initiated at our annual planning workshop each year. Our 2018–19 corporate plan details our focus for the next four years, and outlines our strategies for achieving our purpose and the way in which we will measure our success. The plan communicates to consumers, businesses, the community and our people our medium-term direction and intended business approach.

Our corporate plan is central to planning our future work—focusing on our reason for being as articulated in our vision, purpose and goals. The priorities, goals and performance measures outlined in our corporate plan cascade down to divisional plans and, ultimately, to individual employee performance and development plans. These linkages provide clarity to employees about the expectations of their role and how their role contributes to the achievement of our organisational purpose and goals.

Managing risk and fraud

We are committed to managing risks to protect our users and stakeholders, employees and assets, and ensure compliance with our contractual and statutory obligations. We periodically review, assess and update our strategic risks to account for changes in our environment.

Following a successful pilot in 2018–19, AFSA decided to move to a ‘critical control’ approach for managing AFSA’s strategic risks. This type of approach is expected to result in better risk management capability and engender greater confidence in our risk management processes for strategic risks.

Our approach to risk management includes an overarching framework and plan that outline how we identify, record, rate and seek to mitigate risk, supported by risk management coordinators and risk registers in each division. Coordinators meet regularly to share experiences, review risk registers and progress risk management initiatives.

We have an internal control framework that complements the risk management framework by describing the relationship between operational controls, management oversight mechanisms and independent assurance. This ‘three lines of defence’ model helps to build a comprehensive picture of controls and oversight mechanisms, and enables any control gaps to be more easily identified. We are building our capability to do this more efficiently through documented assurance mapping processes.

We have a fraud control plan that conforms with the requirements of the Commonwealth Fraud Control Framework. The plan documents our approach to controlling fraud at strategic, operational and tactical levels, and encompasses prevention, detection, investigation and reporting measures.

Compliance reporting

In 2018–19, we did not report any significant issues relating to noncompliance with the finance law to the Attorney-General under paragraph 19(1)(e) of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013.

External scrutiny

There were no significant developments in external scrutiny affecting our agency during 2018–19.

There were no judicial decisions, decisions of administrative tribunals, or decisions by the Australian Information Commissioner that had a significant impact on our operations.

There were no agency capability reviews or reports on our operations by the Auditor-General, a parliamentary committee or the Commonwealth Ombudsman during the year.

Management of human resources

In 2018–19, we continued our program of work based on contemporary human resource practice and workforce strategy. We implemented a significant number of new and redesigned workforce initiatives to enhance the capability of our people and to optimise practices in line with our strategic objectives.

Our workforce-related initiatives focused on gender equality—and broader diversity and inclusion—and people management capability, with the introduction of a new approach to individual and team performance. We launched AFSA’s inaugural gender equality strategy, continued to implement AFSA’s wellbeing strategy, and matured our strategic workforce planning approach through full integration with business planning. We also improved our data and analytics capability to support evidence-based workforce decision-making.

We remained within the allocated average staffing level cap throughout the year.

People Strategy 2020

Our People Strategy 2020 entered the third year of its three-year plan and remains an ambitious and transformative agenda. It addresses key strategic people issues with initiatives designed to build an organisation that attracts, retains and develops a highly skilled, engaged and adaptable workforce that delivers high-quality outcomes.

We achieved significant outcomes against the strategy in 2018–19. Our preventative approach to improve staff health through the Wellbeing@AFSA strategy and program of work continued. The focus on employee-led wellbeing initiatives to build a happy, healthy and productive workforce has received industry recognition. Our approach to staff wellbeing resulted in us winning the Innovative HR Teams 2019 award from Human Resources Director Australia magazine. These awards recognise HR teams who think outside the box, driving industry change and using innovative methods that deliver value and benefits to their workforce. Further details regarding Wellbeing@AFSA can be found under the ‘Work health and safety’ section on Other mandatory information.

We released our inaugural gender equality strategy Women@AFSA – #IWILL (Inspiring Women in Life and Leadership). Created by our staff, for our staff, the strategy outlines AFSA-specific pathways to achieve gender equality over the next three years.

As our current People Strategy is approaching the end of its lifespan, we have commenced work on our new three-year workforce strategy, which will focus on further building a contemporary, leading workforce, employee capability and performance development.

Performance management

We implemented a reimagined performance management framework in 2018–19. The new framework aims to improve the capabilities, performance and potential of employees, as well as the ability of employees to achieve organisational outcomes. The focus was to improve the quality of conversations between employees and managers, and in turn see an increase in performance and engagement.

A multidisciplinary team developed guidelines, training and system enhancements in support of the new approach. New policies were introduced to support the updated performance management framework, and a sustained effort was undertaken to communicate to staff about the framework in 2018–19.

We invested significant effort in preparing our staff for this cultural change, shifting the focus from a compliance-driven process to one where regular, meaningful conversations between staff and their managers are the priority. Capability development focused on improving the quality of conversations, developing quality goals, and improving the relationships between employees and their managers.

Workforce planning

Workforce planning, supported by insights from workforce data analysis and analytical modelling, is a foundation of the People Strategy 2020, informing workforce management practices, initiatives and strategies.

During 2018–19, we continued to build our workforce planning capability, with a strong focus on implementing workforce plans to ensure workforce planning facilitates a strategically aligned workforce to deliver improved and equitable outcomes for our users. Implementation of our Strategic Workforce Plan 2017–2020—which identified strategic workforce risks and mitigation initiatives—continued across the four pillars: staffing capacity, workforce capability, service delivery and management structures, and culture and wellbeing.

We matured our succession planning and divisional workforce planning approach, allowing us to continue to monitor and reduce workforce risks, and plan longer-term organisational design and workforce development in line with our strategic priorities. To support this capability development, we built a repository of detailed and timely workforce information, metrics and key performance indicators through online operational reports, manager dashboards and interactive storyline workforce analyses. Ongoing use of technology helps us identify workforce risks during workforce planning discussions and day-to-day workforce management tasks.

During 2018–19, we invested in building evidence-based workforce decision-making capability across the agency under the #WorkforceAnalytics program of work, delivering initiatives such as manager masterclasses and site-based information and training sessions.

Our workforce planning and workforce analytics functions have garnered interest across the public sector and the Australian human resources community. Developing the next generation of workforce analytics and planning professionals is important to the human resources profession and to us. To facilitate this capability, we continued our partnership with the Australian HR Institute, hosting two HR interns who got to experience workforce analytics in practice, working on research projects utilising our 2018 APS Employee Census survey data.

From August to November 2018, we hosted an ACT Government secondee in our Workforce Analytics team, for the purpose of developing workforce analytics capability in the ACT Government’s Strategic HR team in the Chief Minister, Treasury and Economic Development Directorate. This interjurisdictional partnership was recognised as best practice planned mobility, and was featured as a case study of interjurisdictional collaboration by the Australian Public Service Commission.

We remain an active contributor in workforce planning and analytics conversations within the Australian Public Service (APS) and beyond, displaying our work in various forums, and supporting capability development across the broader public service under the outreach component of the People Strategy 2020.

Capability development

Continuing to build an organisation that attracts, retains and develops a highly skilled and engaged workforce has been the focus of our capability development program during 2018–19. Using evidence acquired from our workforce and succession planning processes, along with insights from APS Employee Census results, we continued to develop initiatives to deliver a targeted development program.

Our primary development initiatives focused on contemporary APS core skills, as well as driving our workforce towards future capability needs. Capabilities addressed included leadership, resilience and wellbeing, cultural awareness, change management, governance, general data literacy and data analytics capability.

We maintained our commitment to supporting further education for our staff through the provision of study leave and assistance with tertiary course fees under our studies assistance scheme. Approximately 6 per cent of our staff accessed some form of support under this scheme during 2018–19.

During 2018–19, we supported over 700 places on internal training opportunities. In addition, staff were provided with technical and role-specific capability development, and opportunities to attend conferences related to their role and key strategic focus areas—such as women in leadership, diversity and future of work. Peer-to-peer learning was also heavily promoted, with almost 10 per cent of our staff actively engaged in our mentoring program.

Through our new talent management system, we delivered just-in-time online content and micro-learning opportunities for staff to build skills and capabilities aligned to our capability framework. The framework identifies the behaviours, skills and knowledge required for our future workforce.

In addition to these initiatives, we maintained our focus on staff training in key compliance and governance responsibilities, delivering programs on fraud awareness, risk awareness, security, induction, the APS Values and Code of Conduct, privacy, and contract management.

Values, code of conduct and ethical behaviour

Our corporate plan, client charter and enterprise agreement play a key role in reinforcing the requirement for employees to uphold the APS Values and comply with the APS Code of Conduct. The APS Values and Code of Conduct are incorporated into our capability framework and integrated into people and capability practices across recruitment, selection, onboarding, learning and performance.

Information on the APS Values and Code of Conduct is presented to all new employees on commencement through orientation and induction material. Group-based induction further promotes behavioural expectations and training on the APS Values and Code of Conduct. We also deliver online governance modules that embed the requirement to uphold ethical behaviour in the APS. In 2018–19, employees engaged positively with this form of training.

We work hard to build capability, strengthen a values-based culture and create a respectful workplace, and we have formal procedures in place for investigating and determining breaches of the APS Code of Conduct and for handling complaints or reports through public interest disclosures.

Workplace diversity

Our diversity agenda and initiatives aim to create a more inclusive, productive, innovative, creative and engaged workplace through excellence in service delivery.

We partnered with the Workplace Gender Equality Agency to develop and launch #IWILL – Inspiring Women in Life and Leadership. #IWILL formalises our commitment to advancing and supporting women, an integral part of our achievements and success. The strategy is led by staff, ensuring greater engagement at all levels.

Libby Lyons, Director of the Workplace Gender Equality Agency, attends AFSA’s International Women’s Day event to launch the #IWILL strategy in March 2019.

The cover of AFSA’s Women@AFSA – #IWILL gender equality strategy.

As part of this strategy and our commitment to drive sustainable outcomes for all our staff, we implemented a number of gender equality initiatives in 2018–19, including:

  • establishment of ‘Lean In’ networks for women in AFSA’s ICT, insolvency and enforcement teams
  • partnership with external networks for women across key industry groups and sectors
  • AFSA membership of the Diversity Council of Australia
  • establishment of the Parents@AFSA group to provide resources and support to parents
  • speaker series across all sites to share insights into successful career trajectories of women.

Our diversity agenda commits to improving employment outcomes and enhancing workplace culture through inclusive initiatives for Indigenous Australians; people with disability; lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex employees; and women in leadership. Our commitment to diversity is strengthened through our holistic approach through the senior executive’s endorsement of AFSA’s diversity and inclusion strategy, #iBelong.

Additionally, we recognised and celebrated key dates during the year, such as International Women’s Day, Harmony Day, National Reconciliation Week, NAIDOC Week, and International Day of People with Disability, through dedicated events across all sites.

Our reconciliation vision revolves around creating opportunities to ensure that the interaction and engagement between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and other stakeholders within the personal insolvency and personal property securities fields is fair and fully effective.

Our Reconciliation Action Plan 2017–2020 outlines tangible goals and actions to further our case for reconciliation and tolerance. In 2018–19, we continued our success with the Jawun APS Secondment Program in partnership with the Australian Public Service Commission. The program enhances the capabilities of Indigenous peoples and communities and encourages valuable learnings to be incorporated back into our business practices. We supported the program with a successful 12-week secondment in Ceduna, South Australia. In addition to weekly blogs, presentations were shared at all sites, bringing to life personal and professional learning experiences to further enhance cultural awareness across AFSA.

During 2018, we successfully completed a 12-month internship through Koomarri, an organisation that specialises in placing people with disability into meaningful work. The successful internship and learnings were celebrated at our International Day of People with Disability event. In addition, we continued our relationship with the Australian Network on Disability and placed both a summer and winter intern in the ‘Stepping Into’ program, a paid internship designed for university students with disability.

Figure 9 shows the percentages of staff who indicated they have a disability, those who identified as Indigenous, those who identified as being from a non-English-speaking background, and those who worked on a part-time basis.

Figure 9: Workplace diversity and part-time employment, at 30 June 2019

Our results from the 2019 APS Employee Census reflected positive outcomes on workplace flexibility, and cultural and linguistic diversity. Sixty-two per cent of our staff currently access flexible working options—flexible working hours, and working from home or working away from the office, are the most utilised options.

We have a diverse workforce, with 31 per cent of our staff born outside of Australia, and 27 per cent of staff speaking a language other than English at home.

Employee consultation

The National Consultative Committee and site consultative committees met during the year to facilitate discussions with employees on administrative and workplace issues, including operational policy and practice changes, organisational change, office accommodation, and improvement strategies.

Site consultative committees met quarterly in each of our sites during 2018–19, and the National Consultative Committee met twice during the year.

During the year, the site consultative committees and National Consultative Committee provided guidance and endorsement on important local and national initiatives and projects, such as proposed office relocations, the capability framework, and national policies and guidelines.

Employment conditions and agreement-making

The AFSA Enterprise Agreement 2018 was accepted by a valid majority of staff and will remain in effect until 18 February 2021. The enterprise agreement sets the employment conditions of all non–Senior Executive Service (SES) employees.

As at 30 June 2019, 401 employees were covered by the AFSA Enterprise Agreement 2018. The salary range available for APS employees was $46,651 (APS 1.1) to $141,292 (Executive Level 2.4). In accordance with the terms of the agreement, a 2 per cent pay increase was implemented on commencement of the agreement.

The AFSA Enterprise Agreement 2018 provides our staff members with a range of non-salary benefits, including provisions for flexible working arrangements in accordance with section 65 of the Fair Work Act 2009, flex time, time off in lieu, annual leave half-pay and cash-out, home-based work, an employee assistance program, family care assistance, and assistance with other work-related expenses.

In 2018–19, a total of 28 employees had their employment arrangements supplemented by individual flexibility arrangements in accordance with clause 7 of the enterprise agreement. All substantive SES employees (not including the Chief Executive) have their employment conditions provided for using determinations made under subsection 24(1) of the Public Service Act 1999.

Performance pay

Our enterprise agreement and subsection 24(1) determinations do not include any provision for performance-based pay or bonuses.

Reward and recognition

As an agency, we encourage reward for, and recognition of, employees who make an exceptional contribution to the delivery of AFSA’s strategic priorities. Each division regularly provides opportunities for formal and informal reward and recognition in accordance with our employee recognition program.

Staffing profile

Table 5 shows the number of ongoing employees by gender, location and work status at 30 June 2019, while Table 6 shows comparative figures at 30 June 2018.

Table 5: All ongoing employees, by gender, location and work status, at 30 June 2019

Location

Male

Female

Total

Full-time

Part-time

Total male

Full-time

Part-time

Total female

NSW

32

0

32

38

7

45

77

Qld

37

0

37

42

11

53

90

SA

19

1

20

42

27

69

89

Tas

4

1

5

2

0

2

7

Vic

37

1

38

39

6

45

83

WA

2

0

2

1

0

1

3

ACT

47

3

50

41

11

52

102

NT

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Total

178

6

184

205

62

267

451

Note: At 30 June 2019, AFSA had no ongoing employees of indeterminate gender, and no ongoing employees located in external territories or overseas.

Table 6: All ongoing employees, by gender, location and work status, at 30 June 2018

Location

Male

Female

Total

Full-time

Part-time

Total male

Full-time

Part-time

Total female

NSW

29

1

30

36

11

47

77

Qld

39

0

39

44

7

51

90

SA

19

1

20

40

30

70

90

Tas

3

1

4

2

0

2

6

Vic

41

1

42

38

7

45

87

WA

1

0

1

0

0

0

1

ACT

64

3

67

46

10

56

123

NT

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Total

196

7

203

206

65

271

474

Notes

At 30 June 2018, AFSA had no ongoing employees of indeterminate gender, and no ongoing employees located in external territories or overseas.

Table 6 shows an additional ongoing employee at 30 June 2018, compared to what was reported in last year’s annual report. The discrepancy is due to this year’s data including AFSA’s Chief Executive, who was not included in this data in previous annual reports.

Table 7 shows the number of non-ongoing employees by gender, location and work status at 30 June 2019, while Table 8 shows comparative figures at 30 June 2018.

Table 7: All non-ongoing employees, by gender, location and work status, at 30 June 2019

Location

Male

Female

Total

Full-time

Part-time

Total male

Full-time

Part-time

Total female

NSW

4

0

4

5

2

7

11

Qld

3

0

3

4

2

6

9

SA

0

0

0

2

0

2

2

Tas

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Vic

5

0

5

6

0

6

11

WA

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

ACT

1

0

1

1

1

2

3

NT

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Total

13

0

13

18

5

23

36

Note: At 30 June 2019, AFSA had no non-ongoing employees of indeterminate gender, and no non-ongoing employees located in external territories or overseas.

Table 8: All non-ongoing employees, by gender, location and work status, at 30 June 2018

Location

Male

Female

Total

Full-time

Part-time

Total male

Full-time

Part-time

Total female

NSW

4

0

4

5

2

7

11

Qld

3

0

3

8

3

11

14

SA

0

0

0

1

1

2

2

Tas

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Vic

4

0

4

3

0

3

7

WA

1

0

1

0

0

0

1

ACT

1

0

1

4

1

5

6

NT

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Total

13

0

13

21

7

28

41

Note: At 30 June 2018, AFSA had no non-ongoing employees of indeterminate gender, and no non-ongoing employees located in external territories or overseas.

Table 9 shows the number of ongoing Australian Public Service (APS) employees by gender, classification and work status at 30 June 2019, while Table 10 shows comparative figures at 30 June 2018.

Table 9: APS ongoing employees, by gender, classification and work status, at 30 June 2019

Classification

Male

Female

Total

Full-time

Part-time

Total male

Full-time

Part-time

Total female

SES 3

1

0

1

0

0

0

1

SES 2

1

0

1

0

0

0

1

SES 1

5

0

5

1

0

1

6

EL 2

13

1

14

14

0

14

28

EL 1

46

1

47

31

8

39

86

APS 6

49

1

50

67

11

78

128

APS 5

25

1

26

46

9

55

80

APS 4

25

0

25

26

9

35

60

APS 3

13

2

15

19

23

42

57

APS 2

0

0

0

1

2

3

3

APS 1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Total

178

6

184

205

62

267

451

Note: At 30 June 2019, AFSA had no ongoing APS employees of indeterminate gender.

Table 10: APS ongoing employees, by gender, classification and work status, at 30 June 2018

Classification

Male

Female

Total

Full-time

Part-time

Total male

Full-time

Part-time

Total female

SES 3

1

0

1

0

0

0

1

SES 2

1

0

1

0

0

0

1

SES 1

5

0

5

1

0

1

6

EL 2

16

1

17

12

1

13

30

EL 1

54

1

55

31

6

37

92

APS 6

54

2

56

59

14

73

129

APS 5

23

1

24

51

7

58

82

APS 4

22

0

22

27

7

34

56

APS 3

19

2

21

21

27

48

69

APS 2

1

0

1

4

3

7

8

APS 1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Total

196

7

203

206

65

271

474

Notes

At 30 June 2018, AFSA had no ongoing APS employees of indeterminate gender.

Table 10 shows an additional ongoing employee at 30 June 2018, compared to what was reported in last year’s annual report. The discrepancy is due to this year’s data including AFSA’s Chief Executive, who was not included in this data in previous annual reports.

Table 11 shows the number of non-ongoing APS employees by gender, classification and work status at 30 June 2019, while Table 12 shows comparative figures at 30 June 2018.

Table 11: APS non-ongoing employees, by gender, classification and work status, at 30 June 2019

Classification

Male

Female

Total

Full-time

Part-time

Total male

Full-time

Part-time

Total female

SES 3

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

SES 2

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

SES 1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

EL 2

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

EL 1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

APS 6

1

0

1

4

0

4

5

APS 5

0

0

0

2

1

3

3

APS 4

5

0

5

8

4

12

17

APS 3

7

0

7

4

0

4

11

APS 2

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

APS 1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Total

13

0

13

18

5

23

36

Note: At 30 June 2019, AFSA had no non-ongoing APS employees of indeterminate gender.

Table 12: APS non-ongoing employees, by gender, classification and work status, at 30 June 2018

Classification

Male

Female

Total

Full-time

Part-time

Total male

Full-time

Part-Time

Total female

SES 3

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

SES 2

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

SES 1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

EL 2

0

0

0

0

1

1

1

EL 1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

APS 6

1

0

1

1

0

1

2

APS 5

3

0

3

5

0

5

8

APS 4

2

0

2

6

3

9

11

APS 3

7

0

7

9

3

12

19

APS 2

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

APS 1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Total

13

0

13

21

7

28

41

Note: At 30 June 2018, AFSA had no non-ongoing APS employees of indeterminate gender.

Table 13 shows the number of ongoing and non-ongoing APS employees by classification and work status at 30 June 2019, while Table 14 shows comparative figures at 30 June 2018.

Table 13: APS ongoing and non-ongoing employees, by classification and work status, at 30 June 2019

Classification

Ongoing

Non-ongoing

Total

Full-time

Part-time

Total ongoing

Full-time

Part-time

Total non-ongoing

SES 3

1

0

1

0

0

0

1

SES 2

1

0

1

0

0

0

1

SES 1

6

0

6

0

0

0

6

EL 2

27

1

28

0

0

0

28

EL 1

77

9

86

0

0

0

86

APS 6

116

12

128

5

0

5

133

APS 5

71

10

81

2

1

3

84

APS 4

51

9

60

13

4

17

77

APS 3

32

25

57

11

0

11

68

APS 2

1

2

3

0

0

0

3

APS 1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Total

383

68

451

31

5

36

487

Table 14: APS ongoing and non-ongoing employees, by classification and work status, at 30 June 2018

Classification

Ongoing

Non-ongoing

Total

Full-time

Part-time

Total ongoing

Full-time

Part-time

Total non-ongoing

SES 3

1

0

1

0

0

0

1

SES 2

1

0

1

0

0

0

1

SES 1

6

0

6

0

0

0

6

EL 2

28

2

30

0

1

1

31

EL 1

85

7

92

0

0

0

92

APS 6

113

16

129

2

0

2

131

APS 5

74

8

82

8

0

8

90

APS 4

49

7

56

8

3

11

67

APS 3

40

29

69

16

3

19

88

APS 2

5

3

8

0

0

0

8

APS 1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Total

402

72

474

34

7

41

515

Note: Table 14 shows an additional ongoing employee at 30 June 2018, compared to what was reported in last year’s annual report. The discrepancy is due to this year’s data including AFSA’s Chief Executive, who was not included in this data in previous annual reports.

Table 15 shows the number of APS employees by employment type and location at 30 June 2019, while Table 16 shows comparative figures at 30 June 2018.

Table 15: APS employees, by employment type and location, at 30 June 2019

Location

Ongoing

Non-ongoing

Total

NSW

77

11

88

Qld

90

9

99

SA

89

2

91

Tas

7

0

7

Vic

83

11

94

WA

3

0

3

ACT

102

3

105

NT

0

0

0

Total

451

36

487

Note: At 30 June 2019, AFSA had no APS employees located in external territories or overseas.

Table 16: APS employees, by employment type and location, at 30 June 2018

Location

Ongoing

Non-ongoing

Total

NSW

77

11

88

Qld

90

14

104

SA

90

2

92

Tas

6

0

6

Vic

87

7

94

WA

1

1

2

ACT

123

6

129

NT

0

0

0

Total

474

41

515

Notes

At 30 June 2018, AFSA had no APS employees located in external territories or overseas.

Table 16 shows an additional ongoing employee at 30 June 2018, compared to what was reported in last year’s annual report. The discrepancy is due to this year’s data including AFSA’s Chief Executive, who was not included in this data in previous annual reports.

Table 17 shows the number of APS employees identifying as Indigenous, by employment type, at 30 June 2019, while Table 18 shows comparative figures at 30 June 2018.

Table 17: APS employees identifying as Indigenous, by employment type, at 30 June 2019

Employment type

Indigenous

Ongoing

10

Non-ongoing

0

Total

10

Table 18: APS employees identifying as Indigenous, by employment type, at 30 June 2018

Employment type

Indigenous

Ongoing

11

Non-ongoing

0

Total

11

Table 19 shows the employment arrangements for SES and non-SES employees at 30 June 2019.

Table 19: Employment arrangements for SES and non-SES employees, at 30 June 2019

Type of arrangement

SES

Non-SES

Total

AFSA Enterprise Agreement 2018

0

465

465

Subsection 24(1) determinations*

8

0

8

Individual flexibility arrangements**

0

14

14

Total

8

479

487

* Determinations made under subsection 24(1) of the Public Service Act 1999.

** For the purpose of this table, staff covered by an individual flexibility arrangement are not counted under the AFSA Enterprise Agreement 2018, even though their minimum terms and conditions are set by the enterprise agreement.

Table 20 shows SES and non-SES salary ranges, by classification level, at 30 June 2019.

Table 20: Salary ranges of SES and non-SES employees, by classification level, at 30 June 2019

Classification

Minimum salary ($)

Maximum salary ($)

SES 3

SES 2

277,779

277,779

SES 1

217,190

246,848

EL 2

119,378

141,292

EL 1

98,577

116,041

APS 6

82,748

92,747

APS 5

74,756

80,737

APS 4

67,022

72,769

APS 3

60,135

64,902

APS 2

52,797

58,545

APS 1

46,651

51,560

Executive remuneration

This section provides information on remuneration for AFSA’s key management personnel during 2018–19, including staff who acted in key management personnel roles. Key management personnel are defined in the AFSA People Policy 17/03 – Declarations of Personal, Financial and Other Interests.

The remuneration determination and policies that informed the remuneration decisions for our key management personnel in 2018–19 are:

  • the Remuneration Tribunal (Remuneration and Allowances for Holders of Full-Time Public Office) Determination 2018, which is used to determine the Chief Executive’s remuneration
  • the APS Executive Remuneration Management Policy and the AFSA People Policy 16/38 – SES Remuneration, which provide an outline of the remuneration, benefits and the performance framework applying to the SES at AFSA. We use the annual APS Remuneration Report to support benchmarking activities for SES remuneration. The Chief Executive is the decision-maker for all SES remuneration
  • the AFSA Enterprise Agreement 2018, supported by the AFSA People Policy 19/06 – Remuneration Policy. These documents outline the remuneration, benefits and performance framework for non-SES staff that may be placed or act in a key management personnel position. The Chief Executive is the decision-maker for remuneration arrangements for AFSA personnel that act in an SES position.

Remuneration for our officials generally consists of base salary, allowances and benefits (including gross vehicle parking cost, professional membership payments and study assistance, where applicable), superannuation contributions, and long service leave. We do not have provision for incentive payments or bonuses for any staff within any policy.

Table 21 provides information about remuneration for key management personnel during 2018–19. We did not have any senior executives or other highly paid staff in 2018–19 who are not listed in Table 21.

Table 21: Remuneration for key management personnel, 2018–19

Name

Position title

Short-term benefits ($)

Post-employment benefits ($)

Other long-term benefits ($)

Termination benefits ($)

Total remuneration ($)

Base salary

Bonuses

Other benefits and allowances

Superannuation contributions

Long service leave

Other long-term benefits

Hamish McCormick

Chief Executive

427,602

5,854

61,841

19,710

515,008

Gavin McCosker

Deputy Chief Executive

260,911

15,614

41,653

8,676

326,853

Andrew Sellars

General Counsel

213,636

4,963

39,061

16,930

274,590

Joanna Stone

Chief Finance Officer

199,994

4,668

35,963

11,644

252,268

Peter Edwards

National Manager

219,604

7,294

33,214

13,412

273,523

David Bergman

National Manager

220,022

40,345

16,159

276,526

Paul Shaw

National Manager

227,633

18,723

40,595

11,852

298,804

David Johnson

Chief Information Officer

224,998

5,701

45,213

12,780

288,693

Bridie Dawson

Chief People Officer

169,759

655

26,157

7,657

204,228

Matthew Osborne

General Counsel

13,528

2,327

74

15,929

Vanessa Goodey

Chief Finance Officer

12,119

1,816

64

13,999

Brett Miles

Chief Information Officer

18,679

2,532

101

21,313

Total

 

2,208,487

63,471

370,716

119,059

2,761,733

Note: Carol Lilley was paid $96,319 under a fee-for-service arrangement as an independent (external) member on various management boards.

Asset management

Our fixed asset base covers a wide range of asset types, including office fit-outs, purchased and internally developed software, and plant and equipment. We actively manage and monitor our assets through asset registers, and conduct an annual stocktake of assets to maintain the accuracy of our records. Valuations are also undertaken on a regular basis to ensure that asset values are fairly represented in the annual financial statements.

Our assets team provides operational guidance to staff and maintains a comprehensive set of asset management policies and procedures that are available to all staff on our intranet.

Purchasing

During 2018–19, the Commonwealth Procurement Rules formed the basis for our procurement practices and procedures. The principles in the rules are reflected in our accountable authority instructions and operational guidance, which are available to all employees on our intranet. We review our accountable authority instructions and operational guidance materials on a regular basis to ensure consistency with the Commonwealth Procurement Rules and broad procurement-related policies.

We have a centralised procurement team that coordinates procurement activities and liaises with business areas and financial delegates. The team provides guidance on, and ensures consistency and compliance with, the Commonwealth Procurement Rules and other policies. The team also supports other business areas on matters of risk management, probity, specification development and contract management.

The Commonwealth Procurement Rules require entities to report contracts and amendments on AusTender within 42 days of entering into (or amending) a contract. During 2018–19, we reported eight contracts outside of this timeframe due to administrative oversight.

Australian National Audit Office access clauses

Our standard contract templates include provisions allowing the Auditor-General to access a contractor’s premises. We did not have any contracts that excluded this access provision in 2018–19.

Exempt contracts

In 2018–19, we did not have any contracts or any standing offers with a value of more than $10,000 (inclusive of GST) that were exempted by the Chief Executive from being published on AusTender on the basis that they would disclose exempt matters under the Freedom of Information Act 1982.

Details of all contracts that we entered into in 2018–19, with a value of $10,000 or more, were published on AusTender in accordance with the reporting requirements of the Commonwealth Procurement Rules.

Procurement initiatives to support small business

We support small business participation in the Commonwealth Government procurement market. Participation statistics for small and medium-sized enterprises (fewer than 200 employees) and small enterprises (fewer than 20 employees) are available on the Department of Finance’s website.

Our procurement-related initiatives that support small business include:

  • use of the Commonwealth Contracting Suite for low-risk procurements valued under $200,000
  • use of credit cards for low-risk procurements valued under $10,000
  • participation in whole-of-government arrangements where applicable
  • adherence to the small business engagement principles (outlined in the government’s Industry Innovation and Competitiveness Agenda), such as communicating in clear, simple language and presenting information in an accessible format
  • use of financial management information systems to facilitate on-time payment.

In addition, we are committed to meeting our annual Indigenous Procurement Policy (IPP) targets with the aim of driving demand for goods and services provided by Indigenous suppliers, stimulating Indigenous economic development and growing the Indigenous business sector.

A key target in the IPP is for 3 per cent of new domestic Commonwealth contracts to be awarded to Indigenous suppliers by 2020. During 2018–19, AFSA awarded 3.97 per cent of our domestic contracts to Indigenous suppliers.

Consultants

We engage consultants when we require specialist expertise that is not available in house, or when independent research, review or assessment is required. Consultants are typically engaged to investigate or diagnose a defined issue or problem; carry out defined reviews or evaluations; or provide independent advice, information or creative solutions to assist in our decision-making.

Before engaging consultants, we take into account the skills and resources required for the task, the skills available internally, and the cost-effectiveness of engaging external expertise. The decision to engage a consultant is made in accordance with the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 and related instruments, including the Commonwealth Procurement Rules and our accountable authority instructions.

During 2018–19, 26 new consultancy contracts were entered into and seven ongoing consultancy contracts were active during this period, involving a total actual expenditure of $3,115,328 (inclusive of GST).

Annual reports contain information about actual expenditure on contracts for consultancies. Information on the value of contracts and consultancies is available on the AusTender website.